Month: November 2021

Cynthia Rogers, MD, visits a baby in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. Rogers is helping lead a national study aimed at understanding how prenatal factors and early life experiences influence brain development and behavior in infants and young children. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are
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NICE has created the first guideline for 12 years to identify, treat and manage depression in adults Developed by an independent NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) guideline committee, the new draft guidance for adults with depression focuses heavily on patient choice and a collaborative approach with healthcare practitioners. Looking at existing evidence
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A Houston Methodist study showed a rapid return of seasonal respiratory viruses after COVID-19 restrictions were relaxed in Texas, demonstrating the effectiveness of masking, distancing and other precautionary measures at stopping the spread of many respiratory illnesses, not just COVID-19. This rise in non-COVID respiratory viruses to pre-pandemic levels came on the heels of Texas
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Set kids up for life, with these tips for building gentle resilience They may not pay bills, have full-time jobs, or deal with the pressures of adulthood, but children’s lives can still be extremely stressful as they’re constantly navigating multiple stages of emotional and physical development. Additionally, children experience daily stressors such as conflicts with
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Children who get COVID-19 typically recover quickly and will not require special support upon return to school. However, some people who contract the disease experience persistent symptoms and post-viral complications. These complications can include fatigue, shortness of breath, brain fog, changes in taste and smell, and headaches. This post-viral syndrome is called long-haul COVID-19, more
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Malvina Abbott, 78, a San Diego public defender, joined the Senior Planet Morning Stretch Zoom class to get a little exercise. She got more than she bargained for—in a good way. She’s made some good friends from all that sweating. When Catalina Choy, a fellow Zoom stretch participant from Maryland, visited her son in San
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A patient suffering from COVID-19 receives treatment at the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the “Klinikum Darmstadt” clinic in Darmstadt, Germany, May 20, 2021. Kai Pfaffenbach | Reuters Europe and Central Asia could reach more than 2.2 million total Covid-19 deaths by next March as countries battle a surge of the highly
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While people with certain psychiatric disorders were less likely to test positive for COVID-19, they still faced higher mortality than the general population, researchers reported. Compared with the 11.91% COVID-19 positivity rate in the general population in 2020, individuals with schizophrenia or mood disorders saw lower positivity rates (9.86% each), according to Antonio L. Teixeira,
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A new study summarized in a research letter published in JAMA Pediatrics reveals that a number of factors, including negative impacts from the pandemic during pregnancy, health care experiences, and reports of discrimination, made it less likely that infants received their recommended vaccinations in the first months of their lives. Led by Heidi Preis, MSW,
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Christmas is one of our favorite times of the year, but it isn’t easy or cheap, especially when you consider the pressure and cost of finding a unique holiday present for everyone on your list. But handmade artisan gifts from The Greater Good Store alleviates this seasonal stress with meaningful fair-trade gifts that are also
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. Pfizer announced on Monday that its COVID-19 vaccine provided long-term protection against the virus in a late-stage clinical trial among adolescents ages 12-15. A two-dose series was 100% effective against COVID-19, which was measured between 7 days and 4 months after
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Comorbidities and various risk factors like age, obesity, chronic respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease affect the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition, neurological symptoms are one of the common symptoms of COVID-19, which indicates that the virus can potentially infect and replicate in the central nervous system (CNS). However, various pieces of evidence
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The phrase has been with us for years, and was recently added to the Oxford English Dictionary, but the debate around the subject is only just getting started You’ve probably encountered the term ‘body positivity’ over the past few years. It’s a phrase that has been propelled to the forefront of cultural conversations, sparking critical
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Hypertension is associated with more than a twofold increased risk of developing late-onset epilepsy (LOE) even in patients who have not had a previous stroke, new research suggests. After excluding individuals with normal blood pressure who were taking antihypertensive medication, investigators found hypertension was linked to an almost 2.5-fold higher risk of epilepsy. “Our findings
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Researchers from Mayo Clinic have published a new study on the gut microbiome and C. difficile in the journal Science Translational Medicine: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/10/464/eaam7019. Using a novel mouse model, the researchers found that a subset of patients with diarrhea may be susceptible to C. difficile infection as a result of deleterious changes in their gut bacteria
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As the Science Museum opens its doors to a new exhibition curated with Cancer Research UK, we speak with two science communication masters about the benefits, ethics and sheer fun of communicating your research to the public. In the early 1800s, Sir Humphry Davy – by that time a well-established Royal Institution lecturer – began
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