Allergies & Asthma

This is the sixth story in a series by MedPage Today examining the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations. Past stories reported on the homeless, immigrants in detention, the undocumented, nursing home residents, and incarcerated individuals. With limited national data available to track COVID-19 outcomes by race, states and local municipalities started releasing their own
0 Comments
With the COVID-19 pandemic, non-critical care providers are being asked to assist the critical care community in caring for COVID-19 patients. Although many healthcare systems have been able to handle the burden and ensure the “ideal” care of patients solely by critical care specialists, some systems have been overwhelmed and an “all hands on deck”
0 Comments
Do your asthma symptoms seem to get worse in the winter months? You’re not alone. Depending on your underlying allergies and identified triggers, different seasons can bring on additional symptoms: Wheezing Shortness of breath Frequent respiratory infections Cough – can be chronic, with phlegm, or dry, mild or severe Chest tightness Irritated throat A variety
0 Comments
Allergy doesn’t always look like allergy — and allergy symptoms can manifest in many different ways. Some experience itchy throat and runny nose. Others know their allergies are peaking when they experience headaches or migraines, and some find that headaches are their only allergy symptom. Though a definitive cause of migraines isn’t totally clear, clinical
0 Comments
A breakthrough treatment providing a long-term cure for children with peanut allergies may soon be widely available. A clinical trial at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne showed that an experimental peanut-probiotic treatment led to 82 per cent of children who participated successfully being able to eat peanuts. Four years later, 80 per cent
0 Comments
Got Food Allergies? Add Milk To The Worries For Your Meal by Carmen Heredia Rodriguez: [email protected], @caheredia21, Kaiser Health News (KHN) Since her son Matt was an infant, Lynda Mitchell knew he had a milk allergy. She controlled the symptoms by switching his baby formula. But when he was 1, Halloween proved horrifying. While trick-or-treating in
0 Comments