Children

With prevalence of developmental disorders on the rise, the need to understand brain development has never been more critical. Development of the brain is strongly influenced by the cranium, but this relationship has not been adequately studied because of limitations in imaging technology. Now, researchers from Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and Children’s National Hospital are
0 Comments
Adolescents can speed their recovery after a sport-related concussion and reduce their risk of experiencing protracted recovery if they engage in aerobic exercise within 10 days of getting injured, according to a new University at Buffalo study. Published Sept. 30 in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, the randomized controlled trial conducted by researchers at
0 Comments
The presence of greenspaces near homes and schools is strongly associated with improved physical activity and mental health outcomes in kids, according to a massive review of data from nearly 300 studies. Published online Sept. 29 in the journal Pediatrics, the review conducted by Washington State University and University of Washington scientists highlights the important
0 Comments
When people think of DNA, they visualize a string-like double helix structure. In reality, the DNA double helix in cells is supercoiled and constrained into loops. This supercoiling and looping are known to influence every aspect of DNA activity, but how this happens has not been clear. Published in the journal Nature Communications, a study
0 Comments
Nutritious breakfast and lunch linked to emotional wellbeing in pupils across the age spectrumInclude good nutrition in public health strategies for kids’ mental health, urge researchers. Higher fruit and veg intake are significantly associated with better mental health in secondary school children, while a nutritious breakfast and lunch is linked to emotional wellbeing in pupils
0 Comments
Northwestern Medicine scientists have characterized several variants of the gene GRIK2 that cause nonsyndromic neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), according to a study published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. These findings add two new genetic variants to a growing list of glutamate receptor mutations that can cause neurodevelopmental disorders, according to Geoffrey Swanson, PhD, professor
0 Comments
Everyday exposure to obesity-promoting chemicals (obesogens) represents a significant risk to public health, and needs stronger regulation to minimize exposure and protect people’s health, according to evidence presented today at the 59th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. Dr Leonardo Trasande is an internationally renowned leader in environmental health, who will draw together the
0 Comments
Results from a 10-year study of children and adolescents who underwent a common weight loss operation to treat severe obesity show they safely have long-lasting major weight loss and improvement of their obesity-related medical problems without stunting their growth in height. The study, involving the longest known follow-up of pediatric patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy,
0 Comments
Infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but the clinical manifestations are highly variable. While some individuals remain asymptomatic, others manifest mild flu-like symptoms and some contract a severe life-threatening disease requiring mechanical ventilation and intensive care. There have been several deaths reported due to COVID-19. Why
0 Comments
A common antibiotic has been found to reduce low birth weight and premature births, if taken during pregnancy, in countries where malaria is endemic, according to a research review. The systematic review, led by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and published in The Lancet EClinicalMedicine, found that the antibiotic, azithromycin, reduced low birth weight
0 Comments
A parent-led therapy that supports the social development of babies displaying early signs of autism has significantly reduced the likelihood of an autism diagnosis being made in early childhood, according to world-first research led by CliniKids atthe Telethon Kids Institute. In a study published in JAMA Pediatrics, an international research team led by Professor Andrew
0 Comments
Eighteen months into the covid-19 pandemic, with the delta variant fueling a massive resurgence of disease, many hospitals are hitting a heartbreaking new low. They’re now losing babies to the coronavirus. The first reported covid-related death of a newborn occurred in Orange County, Florida, and an infant has died in Mississippi. Merced County in California
0 Comments
Six stages of engagement in treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been reported by researchers at Boston Medical Center based on a diverse study, inclusive of parents of predominantly racial and ethnic minority children with ADHD. Published in Pediatrics, this new framework has been informed by the experiences of parents throughout the various stages that
0 Comments
Hospitalized COVID-19 patients are substantially more likely to harbor autoantibodies -;antibodies directed at their own tissues or at substances their immune cells secrete into the blood -; than people without COVID-19, according to a new study. Autoantibodies can be early harbingers of full-blown autoimmune disease. If you get sick enough from COVID-19 to end up
0 Comments
Particulate matter (PM) is a major component of air pollution that is increasingly associated with long-term consequences for the health and development of children. In a study recently published in Nature’s Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, Natalie Johnson, PhD, associate professor at the Texas A&M University School of Public Health, and her co-authors synthesized the
0 Comments
A new study by UT Southwestern scientists indicates that an enzyme called protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) appears to be a major driver of preeclampsia, a dangerous pregnancy complication characterized by the development of high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. The finding, published in Circulation Research, could lead to new treatments for preeclampsia
0 Comments
More than 70 percent of breastfeeding women take some form of medication, but 90 percent of those medications are not appropriately labeled for pregnant or lactating women. This means the drugs are taken “off-label” or without Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, largely because they have never been tested in this population. Even less is
0 Comments
In December 2020, two novel messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; however, the early trials excluded lactating women, leading to questions about their safety in this specific population. In a recent study, published in the online edition of Breastfeeding Medicine, researchers at University of
0 Comments
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causal agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, mostly causes symptomatic disease in adults rather than in children. In rare cases, mild COVID-19 symptoms such as headache, drowsiness, myalgia, fatigue, fever, and trivial respiratory symptoms appear in children. In adults with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, neurological manifestations such
0 Comments
Scientists from Israel have recently explored the effectiveness of two-dose and three-dose regimens of the BNT162b2 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine (Pfizer/BioNTech) to reduce viral load in breakthrough infections caused by the delta variant of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Furthermore, they observe that the gradual reduction of vaccine efficacy against viral load
0 Comments
Licensing productive transcription through RNA polymerase II stabilityPlay Video Credit: Northwestern University Northwestern Medicine scientists have identified a critical checkpoint in transcription elongation, the process of synthesizing RNA from a DNA template, according to findings published in Molecular Cell. According to the study, the presence of a protein called SPT5 serves as a “passport,” determining
0 Comments