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Parents have been warned of the negative effects of too much screen time for their babies. A new study found that infants exposed to computer, TV and phone screens for hours could suffer lower cognitive skills later in life.  In a study titled “Associations Between Infant Screen Use, Electroencephalography, Markers and Cognitive Outcomes,” published Monday
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Running does not appear to cause sustained wear and tear of healthy knee cartilage, with research suggesting that the small, short-term changes to cartilage after a run reverse within hours. A systematic review and meta-analysis published in the most recent issue of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage presents the findings involving 396 adults, which compared the “before”
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Researchers have found that a focused ultrasound technique, known as sonobiopsy, can release more neurodegenerative disorder biomarkers in the blood to ease the diagnosis of the diseases. The study, published Tuesday in the journal Radiology, found a non-invasive method to detect biomarkers in blood that were previously restricted by the blood-brain barrier. Focused-ultrasound-mediated liquid biopsy
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Functions like sensing and pacing in implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) tend to resist interference from the energy fields generated by MRI, as long as device programming is properly adjusted before the scan. That applies even to patients with older “legacy” devices implanted before the 2015 advent of MRI-conditional ICDs despite, in practice, prevalent but misguided
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Young adults who survive cancer are more likely than cancer-free siblings to be lonely and to develop emotional distress, risky behaviors, and new chronic conditions as a result, findings from a large retrospective study suggest. Young cancer survivors were two times more likely to report loneliness at study baseline and follow-up. Loneliness at these times
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. The two national emergency declarations dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic will end May 11, President Joe Biden said Monday. Doing so will have many effects, including the end of free vaccines and health services to fight the pandemic. The public health
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Someone experiences a stroke every four seconds in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Learning a short acronym that can spot signs of a stroke can help save lives. A stroke generally occurs when an artery in the body is blocked or an artery ruptures in the brain. However,
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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Thursday that it is withdrawing emergency use authorization for a Covid-19 drug as it is unlikely to be effective against new variants circulating in the population. The drug in question is Evusheld, manufactured by British-Swedish pharmaceutical and biotechnology company, AstraZeneca. It was first authorized in December 2021
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The study covered in this summary was published on ssrn.com as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaway Why This Matters Chemoradiation is a standard treatment option for HPV-associated OPSCC. However, not all patients benefit from chemotherapy, especially patients with early-stage disease. The investigators developed a predictive radiomic image signature to
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Cardiovascular-related deaths increased dramatically in 2020, marking the largest single-year increase since 2015 and surpassing the previous record from 2003, according to the American Heart Association’s 2023 Statistical Update. During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the largest increases in cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths were seen among Asian, Black, and Hispanic people. “We thought
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Sustaining even a single head injury has been linked to a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality in new research. An analysis of more than 13,000 adult participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study showed a dose-response pattern in which one head injury was linked to a 66% increased risk for all-cause mortality, and
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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to pirtobrutinib (Jaypirca) for relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) after at least two lines of systemic therapy, including a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor. Pirtobrutinib is the first and only non-covalent BTK inhibitor approved for use in this MCL setting, manufacturer Eli
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The US Food and Drug Administration approved elacestrant (Orserdu, Stemline Therapeutics, Inc) for postmenopausal women or men with ER-positive, HER2-negative, ESR1-mutated advanced or metastatic breast cancer that progressed on at least one line of endocrine therapy. The agency also approved the Guardant360 CDx assay as a companion diagnostic to identify breast cancer patients who meet
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A number of high-performing medical schools that have withdrawn from the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings also have related hospitals that also regularly top the outlet’s “Best Hospitals” list. So, what might the medical school decampment mean for affiliated hospitals going forward? Indeed, several medical schools have said their decisions to not participate
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Despite improvements in access to health coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), racial disparities in breast cancer mortality rates persist and the underuse of advanced breast imaging may be one culprit, experts say. In a recent position statement, researchers highlighted the disproportionally high breast cancer mortality rates among Black women in Louisiana — a
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The in vitro fertilization (IVF) journey is often considered a woman-oriented narrative. But a new study has found that male habits such as alcohol use can also significantly affect treatment outcomes. The study, published in the journal Molecular Human Reproduction, found alcohol use among men has a significant negative influence on IVF success rates. “We
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