Children

Mind-body practices such as yoga and meditation are increasingly popular tools for promoting health and combating diseases, including type 2 diabetes. Approximately 66% of Americans with type 2 diabetes use mind-body practices and many do so because they believe it helps control their blood sugar. Until now, however, whether mind-practices can reduce blood glucose levels
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A new study explored whether adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for diet and physical activity had any relationship with toddlers’ ability to remember, plan, pay attention, shift between tasks and regulate their own thoughts and behavior, a suite of skills known as executive function. Reported in The Journal of Pediatrics, the study found
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The first large, real-world study of the effectiveness of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines during pregnancy found these vaccines, especially two initial doses followed by a booster, are effective in protecting against serious disease in expectant mothers whether the shots are administered before or during pregnancy. Pregnant women were excluded from COVID-19 mRNA vaccine clinical trials, so
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FINDINGS Women with COVID in pregnancy who are subsequently vaccinated after recovery, but prior to delivery, are more likely to pass antibodies on to the child than similarly infected but unvaccinated mothers are. Researchers who studied a mix of vaccinated and unvaccinated mothers found that 78% of their infants tested at birth had antibodies. Of
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Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a type of cancer affecting the mucus-secreting glands of the lower esophagus -; the tube connecting the throat to the stomach. It is the most common form of esophageal cancer and often preceded by Barrett’s metaplasia (BE), a deleterious change in cells lining the esophagus. Though the cause of EAC remains
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Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare disorder that causes neurocognitive and developmental deficits. However, musical and auditory abilities are preserved or even enhanced in WBS patients. Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have identified the mechanism responsible for this ability in models of the disease. The findings were published today in Cell. Understanding what
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UC Riverside engineers are developing low-cost, robotic “clothing” to help children with cerebral palsy gain control over their arm movements. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of serious physical disability in childhood, and the devices envisioned for this project are meant to offer long-term daily assistance for those living with it. However, traditional robots
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The COVID-19 pandemic has had many deleterious consequences for health care workers, including the challenges of caring for severely ill patients. Resident physicians, in particular, may have been affected by physical as well as psychological consequences of the pandemic. At present, data are sparse on the perceptions, coping strategies and mental health of residents during
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While the COVID-19 pandemic wanes, the U.S. continues to face a national health challenge – the effective and equitable care of individuals with Long COVID. While the federal government is responding to this condition, few of their undertakings directly address clinical care and the potential of disability compensation. To ensure the effective and equitable care
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Researchers from the Epilepsy Neurogenetics Initiative (ENGIN) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that across nearly 50,000 visits, patients continued to use telemedicine effectively even with the reopening of outpatient clinics a year after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, prominent barriers for socially vulnerable families and racial and ethnic minorities persist, suggesting
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A groundbreaking study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago determined the threshold for a new measure of early scarring in the esophagus of children with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which allows immediate intervention during endoscopy to halt further damage and prevent food from getting stuck in the esophagus (feeding tube) of kids
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Children with certain immunodeficiency diseases carry mutations in genes that regulate the body’s immune system against viral infections and they have a higher mortality rate due to COVID-19. This is according to a study by researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Most children infected with the
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Exposure to blue light via regular use of tablets and smartphones may alter hormone levels and increase the risk of earlier puberty, according to data from a rat study presented today at the 60th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. A longer duration of blue light exposure was associated with earlier puberty onset in
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Critical Path Institute (C-Path) has announced it will serve as the convener of the Critical Path for Rare Neurodegenerative Diseases (CP-RND), a new public-private partnership (PPP) to benefit people across multiple rare neurodegenerative diseases, supported by a grant from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Agency announced the PPP today in a press
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Prenatal cannabis exposure following the middle of the first trimester—generally after five to six weeks of fetal development—is associated with attention, social, and behavioral problems that persist as the affected children progress into early adolescence (11 and 12 years of age), according to new research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part
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A recent study published in Frontiers in Neurology found that the most common long COVID symptoms in the pediatric population showed a higher prevalence among patients in the age range of 6-17 years and were identical to those reported in adults. Although the neurological manifestations of post-COVID syndrome faded over time, the psychological impacts persisted, and more
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In a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers performed epidemiologic modeling to update coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated caregiver and parent loss estimates. Study: Orphanhood and Caregiver Loss Among Children Based on New Global Excess COVID-19 Death Estimates. Image Credit: fizkes/Shutterstock Background Related Stories COVID-19–associated deaths have left millions of children bereaved of their caregivers
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A recent study on the acceptance of insect food products published in Food and Quality Preference found that certain types of insect products were better liked by Danish children. Study: Acceptance of Insect Foods Among Danish Children: Effects of Information Provision, Food Neophobia, Disgust Sensitivity, and Species on Willingness to Try. Image Credit: Charoen Krung Photography/Shutterstock Background
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A growing number of hospitals are outsourcing often-unprofitable outpatient services for their poorest patients by setting up independent, nonprofit organizations to provide primary care. Medicare and Medicaid pay these clinics, known as federally qualified health center look-alikes, significantly more than they would if the sites were owned by hospitals. Like the nearly 1,400 federally qualified
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Pregnant people who had bigger fluctuations in stress from one moment to the next-;also called lability-;had infants with more fear, sadness and distress at three months old than mothers with less stress variability, reports a new Northwestern University study that examined how a child’s developmental trajectory begins even before birth. Prior research has found that
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In a recent study published in the Pediatrics journal, researchers assessed the epidemiology of neonatal coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections. Study: Epidemiology of Neonatal COVID-19 in the United States. Image Credit: Iryna Inshyna/Shutterstock Background Neonatal populations have lower rates of COVID-19 infection than adult and pediatric populations, presumably because of innate protective mechanisms. While newborns
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Many transgender parents with children between one-and-a-half and six years of age hesitate to label their child’s gender identity, according to new research from a team at Penn State and Guilford College. In addition, the results suggest that many children with transgender parents play in ways that conform to gendered societal expectations, while others play
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