Clinical Trials & Research

University of California, Irvine-led researchers have discovered that a signaling molecule called SCUBE3 potently stimulates hair growth and may offer a therapeutic treatment for androgenetic alopecia, a common form of hair loss in both women and men. The study, published online today in Developmental Cell, determined the precise mechanism by which the dermal papilla cells
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The emergence and rapid outbreak of a novel coronavirus, namely, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) in China in 2019, caused a global pandemic, which is popularly known as the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (COVID-19). Study: Potential Autoimmunity Resulting from Molecular Mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Spike and Human Proteins. Image Credit: Naeblys/Shutterstock Some of the common
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A Phase 1 clinical trial of a novel influenza vaccine has begun inoculating healthy adult volunteers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The placebo-controlled trial will test the safety of a candidate vaccine, BPL-1357, and its ability to prompt immune responses. The vaccine candidate was developed by researchers at the
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Scientists are constantly seeking to improve the efficiency of the delivery of biologically active particles to the body tissue, using novel vehicles and adjuvants. Study: Lipid-peptide nanocomplexes for mRNA delivery in vitro and in vivo. Image Credit: remotevfx.com/Shutterstock A new paper published in the Journal of Controlled Release reports the methodical development of lipid-peptide nanocomplexes as a
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Tau hyperphosphorylation is the key characteristic pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently studies showed periodontitis and periodontal pathogen are significant risk factors for AD. Treponema denticola (T. denticola), as the main periodontal pathogen of periodontitis, has been reported a possible link with AD, however, the role of T. denticola in AD pathogenesis is still
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As people around the world are learning to live with a new phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers from UConn’s College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, in collaboration with Spanish institutions, have learned valuable lessons about the role social media played during pandemic lockdowns. In a recently published study in the International Journal of
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Susan G. Komen®, the world’s leading breast cancer organization, is awarding $21.7 million to fund 48 new research projects at 26 distinguished academic medical institutions in the U.S. that are focused on improving patient outcomes – particularly for people with the most aggressive breast cancers, or who have experienced a recurrence or metastasis. With this
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Results from one of the largest global studies of atrial fibrillation (AFib) procedures show that the simple approach is usually best when it comes to ablation, a procedure where physicians destroy or ablate cardiac tissue to correct irregular heart rhythms. The findings could change the way patients are treated for AFib. Researchers from Tulane University
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A CDC investigation notice regarding multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections has been posted: https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/backyardpoultry-06-22/index.html Key points: CDC and public health officials in several states are investigating multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to contact with backyard poultry. In total, 219 illnesses have been reported from 38 states, and 27 people have been hospitalized. One in
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A new perspective by researchers from the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio shows the high burden of breast cancer mortality in African American (Black) women versus White women began in the United States in the 1980’s. At that time, breast cancer screening (mammography) and treatments
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Bottom Line: The accuracy of diagnostic mammograms differed across racial and ethnic groups, with variation in several measures of diagnostic performance. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Authors: Sarah J. Nyante, PhD, associate professor of radiology at the University of
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The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a major blip in the health, societal and economic well-being of the whole world for more than two years, following its unexpected emergence in December 2019. This beta-coronavirus undergoes transcription in the host cell, giving rise to multiple polyproteins that are cleaved by viral proteases to
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Having shown that diet can influence gene expression, science is starting to find out more about how this happens. According to an article recently published in Food and Chemical Toxicology, a diet supplemented with or deficient in methionine, an essential amino acid abundant in eggs, meat and seafood, affects the expression of genes associated with
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Thought LeadersHenry FingerhutSenior Policy Analyst for Science & InnovationTony Blair Institute for Global Change In this interview, News-Medical speaks to Henry Fingerhut, Senior Policy Analyst for Science & Innovation at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change, about genomic surveillance and its associated opportunities and challenges. In collaboration with Professor Derrick Crook of Oxford’s Nuffield
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Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show how a molecule that they have identified stimulates the formation of new insulin-producing cells in zebrafish and mammalian tissue, through a newly described mechanism for regulating protein synthesis. The results are published in Nature Chemical Biology. Our findings indicate a new potential target for treating diabetes, in that
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How do cancer cells differ from healthy cells? A new machine learning algorithm called “ikarus” knows the answer, reports a team led by MDC bioinformatician Altuna Akalin in the journal Genome Biology. The AI program has found a gene signature characteristic of tumors. When it comes to identifying patterns in mountains of data, human beings
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Women in rural and regional areas recovering from gynecological cancer and treatment will now have access to a University of Queensland rehabilitation program through telehealth. Professor Sandie McCarthy from UQ’s School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, and co-lead of Mater Research’s Health Care Delivery and Innovation program, said additional funding from Wesley Medical Research
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When accounting for miles traveled during biking, walking, or driving, Black and Hispanic Americans experience higher motor vehicle-related death rates than White Americans or Asian Americans. In 2021, nearly 43,000 people died in motor vehicle-related crashes in the United States—the highest number of US traffic fatalities since 2005, and more than a 10 percent increase
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Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers have been awarded a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the effects of COVID-19 on the brains of adults who had mild or asymptomatic infection. Using neuroimaging, cognitive, and immunological tests, the investigators will examine if SARS-CoV-2 infection induces lasting changes in
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Momelotinib, an oral pill taken once a day, significantly improved outcomes of patients treated for myelofibrosis (MF), a rare but fatal bone marrow cancer, researchers reported June 7. Ruben Mesa, MD, FACP, executive director of the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, presented results of the MOMENTUM phase
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Aqueous droplet formation by liquid-liquid phase separation (or coacervation) in macromolecules is a hot topic in life sciences research. Of these various macromolecules that form droplets, DNA is quite interesting because it is predictable and programmable, which are qualities useful in nanotechnology. Recently, the programmability of DNA was used to construct and regulate DNA droplets
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In a study of patients with high-risk renal cell carcinoma, those who took the drug everolimus daily for up to one year after surgery lived longer without their disease returning (recurrence-free survival, or RFS) than those who did not take everolimus, although the results narrowly missed the clinical trial’s prespecified level for statistical significance. Improvement
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A new study posted on the medRxiv* preprint server found that despite a lower coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine efficacy against reinfection with the Omicron variant, these vaccines demonstrate a marked efficacy against reinfection with severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Alpha and Delta variants, as well as the Omicron variant––lasting up to nine months,
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